KeMCo Course “Museum and Commons”

The KeMCo course has been offered since 2020 as a Museum Commons installed course.

 

* The guidance for “Museums and Commons” course is delivered via a live streaming and a recorded video.

Guidance Date :

Wednesday, March 31, 2021 (5th period)

Online/Real-time/Zoom

Archive: https://youtu.be/6ByDbmUcBhU

If you have taken the course, please use the form below to provide us with your email address and name etc.

https://forms.gle/1biFUsF5pG65tP149

 

Keio Museum Commons will start the KeMCo course in 2020.

 

KeMCo Course in the 2021 Academic Year

The objects that surround us each have a different shape, a different meaning and a different history. How we perceive objects and what we find in them differs from person to person, and objects take on different forms with each interaction. In this lecture, we will use the Keio Museum Commons as a learning field. Keio Museum Commons is a new museum at Keio University designed as a place where various communities at the university can interact with each other using artefacts as a starting point, and where real space and digital space are connected. In the lecture students will learn how to interact with physical and digital objects through hands-on practice, discussion and creation using digital tools.

 

Museum and Commons Ⅰ (Spring semester)

Museum and Commons I: Interaction with Physical and Digital Objects

 

In the spring semester, we will use the exhibitions in the Museum Commons and the cultural assets of Mita Campus to practically learn Object-based Learning methods and discuss the boundaries between physical and digital objects through topics such as media and art and digital archives.
This course will be held face-to-face. It is recommended to take both spring and autumn semesters in order to deepen your learning step by step.

 

 

Course Plan:

No.1 Interacting with objects (Introduction)
Share how the class will work and introduce the overall theme.
No.2 Learning from / about objects: An Introduction to Object Based Learning (OBL).What is OBL? An introduction to OBL, with some practical work.
No.3 Observing objects: “Gathering-scape” — Practice of Object Based Learning-1

Students visit the exhibition “Gathering-scape” in Museum Commons and practice OBL.

No.4 Discussion based on “Gathering-scape”: Object Based Learning practice – 2

Students will develop the work of the previous week and practice OBL through discussion.

No.5 Observing objects: (Western) Letter-scape

A hands-on visit to the exhibition “(Western) Letter-scape” at the Mita Media Centre, followed by OBL discussion.

No.6 Observing objects: Letter-scape

A hands-on visit to the Museum Commons exhibition “Letter-scape” and practice OBL.

No.7 Discussion based on “Letter-scape”

Building on the previous week’s work, students will practice OBL through discussion.

No.8 Objects in the digital world

Learn about the digital technologies used in the museum commons and in the exhibition “Cross-scapes”. What are the technologies that support museums and exhibitions, and what are the ideas behind them?

No.9 The contact point between the digital and the physical

Objects that oscillate between the physical and the digital. How do we relate to the objects of the two worlds in a society based on the Internet? With various examples, we explore the real contact between people and objects.

No.10 Keio Object Hub hands-on training

The Keio Object Hub is a system for digitally displaying Keio’s cultural assets in a variety of ways. In this session, we will learn about the role and technology of the Keio Object Hub through hands-on practice.

No.11 Media and Art-1: digital and expression, development of materiality

This course provides an overview of the trajectory of the fusion of digital technology/media in contemporary art, and studies digital and expression and the materiality of art, with a focus on media art.

No.12 Media and Art-2: discussion

Building on the previous week, we will have a discussion about art and digital technology/media.

No.13 Wrap-up

Students who wish to take this course are required to attend the guidance. If you are unable to attend the guidance, a video of the guidance will be made available online later for view.

 

 

Museum and Commons Ⅱ (Fall semester)

Museum and Commons II: Interaction with Physical and Digital Objects”

 

In the autumn semester, students will deepen their practice of Object-based Learning and learn about different techniques of digitisation in a practical way, considering the role of digital objects.
This course will be held face-to-face. It is recommended to take both spring and autumn semesters in order to deepen your learning step by step.

Course Plan:

No.1 About Object-based Learning (OBL) / Physical Objects and Digital Objects (Introduction)
We will review what OBL is and discuss the interrelationship between physical and digital objects.
No.2 Reading/talking about the object-1

Over the work “FFIGURATI #314” by Enrico Isamu Oyama, lecturers with diverse areas of expertise will describe, talk and dialogue about the same work from different perspectives.

No.3 Reading/talking about the object-2

Following on from the previous week, we will work through the same work, with an emphasis on opening it up to dialogue, with a view to using the OBL description sheets.

No.4 Reading/talking about objects-3 (guest talk).

We will practice further talks and dialogues around the same work, but from different standpoints.

No.5 Restoration and conservation of objects-1: physical and digital in the restoration exhibition

We will visit a restoration exhibition in the Museum Commons and practice OBL. We will also consider the role of digital technology in the practice of restoration and conservation.

No.6 Restoration and conservation of objects-2: discussion based on the restoration exhibition
Discussion based on the previous week’s visit. In particular, the possibilities of digital objects in restoration and conservation will be discussed.
No.7 Restoring and preserving objects – 3: restoring and preserving objects and technology

In the restoration of cultural assets, it is essential to understand the materials and techniques of the objects, and technology is used for this purpose. In this unit, you will learn how to analyse objects in restoration through several examples.

No.8 A technique for connecting the digital and the physical

How do objects develop or transform in a highly information-oriented society? With the latest research trends, we will give an overview of the events and changes that have occurred as a result of the “connection” between real and digital space, and look at the possibilities of this connection.

No.9 Digital Humanities: an Introduction

Recently, the field of “digital humanities” (humanities informatics) has been attracting attention as a new perspective on the study of literature, history, aesthetics, and other humanities. In the next four lectures, including this one, we will learn the basic ideas, methods and techniques of digital humanities through a blend of lectures and practical exercises.

No.10 Digital Humanities practice (1): texts and images

How has the humanities been extended through the digitization of textual and image materials? This course systematically covers the historical evolution of this process, its impact on our way of thinking, our discipline and society, and the specific methods used.

No.11 Digital Humanities practice (2): 3D

Three-dimensional (3D) representations are increasingly being used not only for recording and preserving cultural assets, but also in virtual museums such as VR and AR. In this session, we will explore the possibilities of 3D together with the students.

No.12 Digital Humanities practice (3): Linked Open Data

How can cultural assets and activities that have been accumulated over thousands of years of human history be shared?In this course, we will learn about the structure and use of global data spaces, with a focus on Linked Open Data, which Museum Commons is also working on.

No.13 Wrap-up

Students who wish to take this course are required to attend the guidance. If you are unable to attend the guidance, a video of the guidance will be made available online later for view.

 

Lecturer:

Yu Homma, Fumi Matsuya, Goki Miyakita, Yohko Watanabe, Shiho Hasegawa

 

※ As a general rule, students who wish to take this course must attend the guidance. If you are unable to attend, check the video recording of the guidance posted online. *

※ This course is organized as part of the University’s educational program, and is therefore only open to those affiliated with the University.