About

Keio Museum Commons

"Keio Museum Commons [KeMCo]" is a common space in which students, academics, university staff, and alumni can mingle. Keio University’s ‘Banraisha’ common room was originally designed for this purpose. The aim of KeMCo is to create a ‘commons’ within a museum that is neither public nor private, but open to all kinds of community activities.

KeMCo is a place where people from different communities linked to the university can come together to exchange ideas about cultural assets. At KeMCO, cultural assets of the university meet and interact, and are connected to a global network through advanced digital technologies.

What's on at Keio

02

Keio University's Activities

This is an introduction to events involving cultural assets taking place at various locations across Keio University, including exhibitions, lectures, and workshops.

01

KeMCo's Activities

This is an introduction to events hosted by KeMCo, including exhibitions, lectures, workshops.

Instagram

Facilities and Tools

Digital Tools

KeMCo provides diverse access points to information on cultural assets through classes, events and exhibitions by introducing new digital technologies.

Architecture and Space

The architecture has open space where visitors can experience the academic activities that support university museums. Conceptually and visually linked to other historic buildings of the Mita campus, it forms a “cultural and historical zone” that integrates the buildings and landscape.

  • Collection

    Collection at KeMCo

    KeMCo will hold a collection centered on the art materials donated by the Century Cultural Foundation and related academic materials after opening in April 2021.

  • Collections at Keio University

    Keio University has many works of art, cultural assets, and valuable academic materials in its collections, including multiple important cultural properties. The collections at Keio extend over a range of disciplines.

Should this place be called a “study” or a “room where shadows reside”?  ...The simple act of placing a fold in a piece of paper. Mere pieces of letter stationery which might better be called koushin-shi (communication-poem or correspondences ). ...These are both objects and words. A book which will forever remain unbound. Nor can the pages be put in order. — Shuzo Takiguchi, “Hakushi no Shuhen (margin of blank)”   One Object ‘with Latent Sounds’ Containing within it a tangible rendering of a single act. — Shuzo Takiguchi, “The Ship for Ararat or The Days of Small Insights into Honey of the Sky”     The study of Shuzo Takiguchi (1903-1979) is both a place where he produced his works, and a “room where shadows reside”; that is to say, a field for the various thoughts and memories which roamed throughout this space during the production process. *1 After his death, vast volumes of materials “Containing both time and dust. Pebbles, empty sardine tins...Decaying leaves” were left behind. This is a mountain of marginalia which some would consign to the dustbin as rubbish, and others reject as mere relics of fetish. Takiguchi, however, used these materials to create weird and wonderful books, his so-called “handmade brochures.”   These brochures which, being meticulously assembled by Takiguchi with his own hands, were not subject to the various processes of publishing houses or printing presses. They are created from a patchwork of fragments, including magazine clippings, tinfoil, labels, stickers, and handwritten notes, and can alternately appear complete or as works in progress. For Takiguchi, if the study is a “room where shadows reside,” then it is in these “handmade brochures” created there that these “shadows” can be found nestling.   What was Takiguchi trying to accomplish with these “handmade brochures” that are perhaps too fragile to even be called books being so weakly bound; with even this on occasion neglected. At this exhibition, we will interrogate the role and nature of the materials within an archive, while exploring the thinking behind Takiguchi’s production process, which sought poetry in a series of acts directed towards “the discovery of perpetual motion” and “hypothetical motion,” through brochures as “tangible renderings of a single act” (“The Ship for Ararat or The Days of Small Insights into Honey of the Sky”)

When stating that somebody is an interesting person, or a boring person, one is actually reducing various behaviors of that person into a flat image and entrenching her or him in this thin plate. However, of course, that person’s behaviors are not always interesting or boring, but just different each time. Above all, what character one applies to the person depends purely on one’s perspective and standpoint.   This solo exhibition by Yuki Okumura revolves around his latest film entitled The Man Who (2019), which puts together nine people’s recollections about somebody they call “him.” It is Okumura’s attempt to untangle the rigidly fixed bundle to which diverse aspects of “him” have been reduced, multilayering the image through a series of procedures reminiscent of overlaying different photographic plates one after another. Here, “he” indeed emerges as a singular man every time the pronoun is uttered, but also transforms into plural men as the nine interviewees deliver their stories. This duality tears apart the man/men toward two poles, namely their most general states and their most specific states, between which we encounter countless versions of “the man who” — each is simultaneously “him” who looks very much like anybody and a double of “him” who looks absolutely like nobody.   Another component of the show is the artist’s act of placement of a collection of three reference items related to the film into the archive of Keio University Art Center, lasting just for the exhibition’s duration.* Along with The Man Who, which is at once an artistic account in the form of film and an oral historical referential material, this intervention is to provoke fresh discussions as to what a material really is for the archive that includes it and what kind of possibilities such an archival material can open up. Indeed, as shown by the nine individuals narrating their personal memories with “him” in the film, the body of each of us is an archive on its own, established in this physical world and accessible only for a fleeting moment.     * Open to any researcher but a preliminary online reservation is necessary. Image: adapted from a photograph by Jean-Hubert Martin, 1993

KeMCoについて

About

Keio Museum Commons

"Keio Museum Commons [KeMCo]" is a common space in which students, academics, university staff, and alumni can mingle. Keio University’s ‘Banraisha’ common room was originally designed for this purpose. The aim of KeMCo is to create a ‘commons’ within a museum that is neither public nor private, but open to all kinds of community activities.

KeMCo is a place where people from different communities linked to the university can come together to exchange ideas about cultural assets. At KeMCO, cultural assets of the university meet and interact, and are connected to a global network through advanced digital technologies.

What's on at Keio

01  KeMCo's Activities

This is an introduction to events hosted by KeMCo, including exhibitions, lectures, workshops.

02  Keio University's Activities

This is an introduction to events involving cultural assets taking place at various locations across Keio University, including exhibitions, lectures, and workshops.

Facilities

Digital Tools

KeMCo provides diverse access points to information on cultural assets through classes, events and exhibitions by introducing new digital technologies.

Architecture and Space

The architecture has open space where visitors can experience the academic activities that support university museums. Conceptually and visually linked to other historic buildings of the Mita campus, it forms a “cultural and historical zone” that integrates the buildings and landscape.

Collection

Collection at KeMCo

KeMCo will hold a collection centered on the art materials donated by the Century Cultural Foundation and related academic materials after opening in April 2021.

Collections at Keio University

Keio University has many works of art, cultural assets, and valuable academic materials in its collections, including multiple important cultural properties. The collections at Keio extend over a range of disciplines.