About

Keio Museum Commons

"Keio Museum Commons [KeMCo]" is a common space in which students, academics, university staff, and alumni can mingle. Keio University’s ‘Banraisha’ common room was originally designed for this purpose. The aim of KeMCo is to create a ‘commons’ within a museum that is neither public nor private, but open to all kinds of community activities.

KeMCo is a place where people from different communities linked to the university can come together to exchange ideas about cultural assets. At KeMCO, cultural assets of the university meet and interact, and are connected to a global network through advanced digital technologies.

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Ask KeMCo

Digital

Keio Object Hub

Keio Object Hub is a portal site that will promote the cultural collections held at Keio University alongside on-campus cultural activities.

KeMCo StudI/O

KeMCo StudI/O is a creation studio with digitalisation and fabrication functions. The studio offers the opportunity to photograph and measure (including 3D scanning) cultural assets, and to work with digital data using tools such as a 3D printer.

Unlock the history of travelling books in Europe and Japan Books are cultural artefacts that are easily transported and translated. As such, they have been important in fostering relationships between countries for hundreds of years. On this three-week course presented by Keio University and the British Library, you’ll learn more about the history of European and Japanese literature promoting cultural exchange, how this continues in the digital era, and how vital this exchange is. Delve into the history of travelling books To start you’ll find out how books moved between Europe and Japan, beginning in the 16th century. Discover how the books were received, compare printing styles, and find out about the role that Jesuit priests played in these book-sharing interactions. Explore the rich heritage of travelling books and travel books In the second and third weeks of the course, you’ll get to appreciate how travelling books influenced individuals, society, and European and Japanese literature. Besides explaining the importance of rare and illustrated books, the course shows you how to trace physical signs on the pages that show what life was like for readers and collectors in the past. Finally, you’ll learn about the way travel books led to great cultural exchange by allowing people to learn about places that they would never otherwise have experienced. The way these books exist in the digital era will be examined throughout. Expand your history know-how with leading experts The course is jointly produced by Japan’s Keio University and the British Library, which are both recognised in their own countries and abroad. With their rich resources and longtime friendship, these institutions will deepen your understanding and appreciation of European culture, Japanese culture, and how books brought (and bring) them together. We would like to acknowledge the following experts for providing valuable contributions to this course: Kristian Jensen, Former Head of Collections and Curation, the British Library / Chair of the Consortium of European Research Libraries Karen Limper-Herz, Lead Curator, Incunabula & Sixteenth Century Printed Books, Western Heritage Collections, the British Library Hamish Todd, Head of East Asian Collections, the British Library Alessandro Bianchi, Bodleian Japanese Librarian, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford Japanese-English translation by Daichi Ishikawa, an English Literature specialist at Keio University.

  In countries where brushes were used as a means to write, a culture of appreciating calligraphy is particularly developed, and Japan is no exception. During the Edo Period, it became widespread to prize ancient calligraphy called “Kohitsu”, with a fashion for cutting up incomplete books, and appreciating and collecting the segments (Kohitsugire) as works of calligraphy as art. Due to the convention of classifying and arranging them by calligrapher, families established themselves whose employment was calligraphy appraisal. The Kohitsu Family was that central presence, called the Kohitsu Honke (main family) to differentiate it from branch families (sub-families).  In the Century Akao Collection is a huge quantity of material and records accrued by the Kohitsu Family, covering the roughly 300 years of their appraisal activities from early Edo Period into the Showa Period. The task of identifying the calligraphers could be a fight with the impossible. The display on this occasion, in combination with material from the Institute of Oriental Classics (Shido Bunko), Mita Media Center (Keio University Library), etc., introduces how individuals of the Kohitsu Family, throughout the ages, grappled with their work.   There are also workshops planned at Keio Museum Commons focusing on the actual producing of Kohitsugire, segments from old books.   Organized by Keio Museum Commons,  Institute of Oriental Classics (Shido Bunko) Cooperated by Mita Media Center (Keio University Library)

About KeMCo

About

Keio Museum Commons

"Keio Museum Commons [KeMCo]" is a common space in which students, academics, university staff, and alumni can mingle. Keio University’s ‘Banraisha’ common room was originally designed for this purpose. The aim of KeMCo is to create a ‘commons’ within a museum that is neither public nor private, but open to all kinds of community activities.

KeMCo is a place where people from different communities linked to the university can come together to exchange ideas about cultural assets. At KeMCO, cultural assets of the university meet and interact, and are connected to a global network through advanced digital technologies.

What’s On

Digital

Keio Object Hub

Keio Object Hub is a portal site that will promote the cultural collections held at Keio University alongside on-campus cultural activities.

KeMCo StudI/O

KeMCo StudI/O is a creation studio with digitalisation and fabrication functions. The studio offers the opportunity to photograph and measure (including 3D scanning) cultural assets, and to work with digital data using tools such as a 3D printer.